My Journey from Fat to Fit

Scroll to Info & Navigation

Today was a good day

I went to a counselling session this morning. It went well. I talked about my uncle’s recent suicide and everything else going on in my life. My therapist thinks I’m doing well and I’m inclined to agree. I’ve just got some things to work on.

My parents are finally back in town after being away for the funeral. I talked to my mom quite a bit about my uncle (her brother). It’s been an awful experience for her, but she seems to be handling it well.

This evening I did a set of six 1,000m repeats. They went beautifully. It was just one of those perfect runs where fast feels comfortable and your feet spring off the pavement.

Things are getting better.

Disclaimer: If you’ve ever sought my advice please be aware that I generally do not follow my own advice. Or anyone’s advice for that matter. Basically I’m an irrational automoton randomly stumbling through life.

The liquor store started carrying one of my favourite varieties of beer: kriek. It’s a Belgian lambic, which is fermented from yeast naturally occurring in the environment. Lambics are sour — kinda like sourdough bread — but kriek has cherry juice added to balance out the flavour.

The liquor store started carrying one of my favourite varieties of beer: kriek. It’s a Belgian lambic, which is fermented from yeast naturally occurring in the environment. Lambics are sour — kinda like sourdough bread — but kriek has cherry juice added to balance out the flavour.

I did 10K with the Terry Fox Run and then topped it off with another 19 to make it my long run.

There was this foreign boarding student from the nearby private school running at about the same pace as me. He was maybe 16. He was wearing sweatpants and I think basketball shoes. At the turnaround someone commented to the student that she’d heard he was planning to run the 10K course three times. She asked him why and he said, “because everyone said I couldn’t.” 

He was obviously unprepared, and my gut instinct was to tell him that it was a terrible idea.  But instead I said, “that’s a good reason to do anything.” 

I dropped him hard not long after but I passed him a few more times when I was making up my extra mileage. At one point he said he was going to do it even if he had to walk. After 10K he was mostly walking. I gave him a high five each time we met and he’d start running again.

What he did wasn’t particularly impressive, but he gets credit from me for biting more than he could chew and not giving up.

fatman2fitman:

I just realized that the annual Terry Fox run is this Sunday. For those of you in Canada this needs no explanation; check out http://www.terryfox.org/Run/ to see where your local run is.
For anyone else, here’s a bit of background. I’ve posted this before but I think it’s worth repeating. 

Terry was an 18-year-old first year Kinesiology student at Simon Fraser University and a member of the SFU junior varsity basketball team in 1977 when he was diagnosed with bone cancer that resulted in the amputation of his right leg six inches above the knee. After undergoing chemotherapy and seeing other people, particularly children, suffering with cancer, Terry decided that he wanted to make a difference in the world. He wanted to do something to help cure this dreadful disease.
Terry began his Marathon of Hope on April 12, 1980 in St. John’s, Newfoundland. When he was forced by a recurrence of cancer to stop his cross-Canada run at Thunder Bay, Ontario, on September 1, 1980, he had completed a total of 5,373 km over 143 days, the equivalent of a marathon every day. After a courageous battle with cancer, he passed away in June 1981.
Few people are aware of the physical enormity of what Terry did in his Marathon of Hope run across Canada. He ran 26 miles per day, 7 days per week. Imagine how sore your legs would be if you walked 26 miles, day after day, on pavement. Imagine how much sorer your legs would be if you ran 26 miles, day after day. Few people could stand up to such punishment. Then try to imagine how incredibly difficult and painful it would be to run 26 miles per day with an artificial limb. It is almost beyond comprehension.
It was a journey that Canadians will never forget. His courage, determination, humanitarianism, and selflessness have been an inspiration to millions of people.
Since Terry’s death in 1981, the Terry Fox Foundation has raised over 600 million dollars worldwide for cancer research. This money has been used to produce better treatments for many different types of cancers. These newer treatments reduce suffering and prolong life and bring us closer to an eventual cure for cancer.
In November 2004, Canadians voted Terry Fox the second Greatest Canadian of all time, after Tommy Douglas, following a nationwide contest organized by CBC (over 1.2 million votes were cast). A 1999 national internet survey named him Canada’s greatest hero.


It’s that time of year again. The Terry Fox Run is tomorrow (Sunday, September 14, 2014) and I’ll be running it.

fatman2fitman:

I just realized that the annual Terry Fox run is this Sunday. For those of you in Canada this needs no explanation; check out http://www.terryfox.org/Run/ to see where your local run is.

For anyone else, here’s a bit of background. I’ve posted this before but I think it’s worth repeating. 

Terry was an 18-year-old first year Kinesiology student at Simon Fraser University and a member of the SFU junior varsity basketball team in 1977 when he was diagnosed with bone cancer that resulted in the amputation of his right leg six inches above the knee. After undergoing chemotherapy and seeing other people, particularly children, suffering with cancer, Terry decided that he wanted to make a difference in the world. He wanted to do something to help cure this dreadful disease.

Terry began his Marathon of Hope on April 12, 1980 in St. John’s, Newfoundland. When he was forced by a recurrence of cancer to stop his cross-Canada run at Thunder Bay, Ontario, on September 1, 1980, he had completed a total of 5,373 km over 143 days, the equivalent of a marathon every day. After a courageous battle with cancer, he passed away in June 1981.

Few people are aware of the physical enormity of what Terry did in his Marathon of Hope run across Canada. He ran 26 miles per day, 7 days per week. Imagine how sore your legs would be if you walked 26 miles, day after day, on pavement. Imagine how much sorer your legs would be if you ran 26 miles, day after day. Few people could stand up to such punishment. Then try to imagine how incredibly difficult and painful it would be to run 26 miles per day with an artificial limb. It is almost beyond comprehension.

It was a journey that Canadians will never forget. His courage, determination, humanitarianism, and selflessness have been an inspiration to millions of people.

Since Terry’s death in 1981, the Terry Fox Foundation has raised over 600 million dollars worldwide for cancer research. This money has been used to produce better treatments for many different types of cancers. These newer treatments reduce suffering and prolong life and bring us closer to an eventual cure for cancer.

In November 2004, Canadians voted Terry Fox the second Greatest Canadian of all time, after Tommy Douglas, following a nationwide contest organized by CBC (over 1.2 million votes were cast). A 1999 national internet survey named him Canada’s greatest hero.

It’s that time of year again. The Terry Fox Run is tomorrow (Sunday, September 14, 2014) and I’ll be running it.

Just ran my fastest 5 miles ever

And in a training run. 

My time was 30:13. That’s nearly a minute faster than my previous best of 31:06 (also a training run). My best 5-mile race is 31:13 on a slow course.

This was a big confidence boost. It’s the first run of this training cycle to show my fitness is as good or better than it was in my previous cycle. I’m just hoping that my speed carries over to the longer distances. It should, because that’s what my training has focused on.